Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year 2019 February 14th BREAD & CIRCUSES: FUN, FROLIC AND FREAK SHOWS IN A MULTI-MEDIA FORMAT LIBBY HORNER It’s all Juvenal’s fault. A political strategy for keeping the masses happy – give them food and entertainment. So they had gladiators and exotic animals and chariot races – mostly pretty cruel and violent – but they also had plays and pantomimes and public baths. The Circus Maximus was huge, seating 350,000 people and one could exit via the gift shop. In 1768 the circus was reinvented in Britain by Philip Astley and celebrates its 250 th anniversary in 2018 – think of those legendary names Bertram Mills, Chipperfields and Billy Smart. Find fun, frolic and freak shows in my inimitable innovative multi-media format lecture, combining art (Laura Knight, Georges Roualt etc), photographs, archival film, songs, music and quotations from writers and poets. There might even be some bread. Click here for the history of the Circus March 14th THE WALLACE & FRICK COLLECTIONS AND THEIR CONNECTION WITH KNOLE HILARY WILLIAMS Raffle for Heritage Volunteers Amazingly the connoisseurship which led to the sumptuous collections at the Wallace Collection in London and the Frick in New York, is linked by a circle of patrons, dealers and taste.  Apart from Sir Richard and Lady Wallace and the American industrialist Henry Clay Frick, there was someone who worked for them all, who then left a related fortune to the mother of Vita Sackville- West.  Therein lies a great story. Click here to read about the Wallace collection scandal. April 11th THE MIS-SHAPEN PEARL: AN OVERVIEW OF THE MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE PERIOD SANDY BURNETT Starting in 1607 with Monteverdi’s astonishing opera Orfeo, and ending in 1759 with the death of that great “English” composer George Frideric Handel, the Baroque era produced music of great brilliance and emotional depth. In helping to navigate us through its choppy waters, Sandy draws on his experience as broadcaster, conductor and hands-on practical musician. His in-depth exploration of this fascinating period of Classical music draws on hand-picked images, autograph scores and recorded musical illustrations, with a special focus on the work of Johann Sebastian Bach. Click here for background on the baroque period music. May 9th THE RICHEST OF LEGACIES: THE BRITISH COLONIAL BUILDINGS OF INDIA ANTHONY PEERS This lecture’s narrative revolves around my experience of having masterminded a British Government backed project to restore the magnificent George Gilbert Scott designed university buildings in Mumbai (Bombay), India. The chapters of this building’s story- its design (in England), construction, history and, of course, its restoration – provide useful startpoints from which to consider the broader historical, cultural and architectural context. For instance the lecture looks into Bombay’s economic boom of the 1860s. This coincided with the high point of the Gothic Revival: Nowhere else in the world can claim to have as magnificent an assemblage of Gothic Revival buildings. Whilst examining the city’s colonial architecture study is made of the carvings of Bombay’s Jeejeebhoy School of Art (see above), whose Architectural Sculpture Department (during this mid-Victorian heyday) was headed up by John Lockwood Kipling, father of Rudyard Kipling. The story of the award winning project to restore the University of Mumbai’s Gothic Revival buildings provides an opportunity to touch upon philosophical approaches to conservation as well as traditional repair techniques. Account is also given of the work undertaken by those who took time away from their respective Cathedral workshops in the UK to transfer knowledge and skills to their Indian counterparts. Venturing beyond Mumbai to consider key colonial buildings in Delhi, Kolkata (Calcutta) and Yangon (Rangoon), the scope of the lecture broadens to examine evolving attitudes in India and beyond (as well as in the UK) towards the British empire and also towards the buildings which survive as testament to its achievements. Bombay University Garden, circa 1890
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
         Lectures 2018/19 Membership Year Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year 2019 February 14th BREAD & CIRCUSES: FUN, FROLIC AND FREAK SHOWS IN A MULTI-MEDIA FORMAT LIBBY HORNER It’s all Juvenal’s fault. A political strategy for keeping the masses happy – give them food and entertainment. So they had gladiators and exotic animals and chariot races – mostly pretty cruel and violent – but they also had plays and pantomimes and public baths. The Circus Maximus was huge, seating 350,000 people and one could exit via the gift shop. In 1768 the circus was reinvented in Britain by Philip Astley and celebrates its 250 th anniversary in 2018 – think of those legendary names Bertram Mills, Chipperfields and Billy Smart. Find fun, frolic and freak shows in my inimitable innovative multi-media format lecture, combining art (Laura Knight, Georges Roualt etc), photographs, archival film, songs, music and quotations from writers and poets. There might even be some bread. Click here for the history of the Circus March 14th THE WALLACE & FRICK COLLECTIONS AND THEIR CONNECTION WITH KNOLE HILARY WILLIAMS Raffle for Heritage Volunteers Amazingly the connoisseurship which led to the sumptuous collections at the Wallace Collection in London and the Frick in New York, is linked by a circle of patrons, dealers and taste.  Apart from Sir Richard and Lady Wallace and the American industrialist Henry Clay Frick, there was someone who worked for them all, who then left a related fortune to the mother of Vita Sackville-West.  Therein lies a great story. Click here to read about the Wallace collection scandal. April 11th THE MIS-SHAPEN PEARL: AN OVERVIEW OF THE MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE PERIOD SANDY BURNETT Starting in 1607 with Monteverdi’s astonishing opera Orfeo, and ending in 1759 with the death of that great “English” composer George Frideric Handel, the Baroque era produced music of great brilliance and emotional depth. In helping to navigate us through its choppy waters, Sandy draws on his experience as broadcaster, conductor and hands-on practical musician. His in-depth exploration of this fascinating period of Classical music draws on hand- picked images, autograph scores and recorded musical illustrations, with a special focus on the work of Johann Sebastian Bach. Click here for background on the baroque period music. May 9th THE RICHEST OF LEGACIES: THE BRITISH COLONIAL BUILDINGS OF INDIA ANTHONY PEERS This lecture’s narrative revolves around my experience of having masterminded a British Government backed project to restore the magnificent George Gilbert Scott designed university buildings in Mumbai (Bombay), India. The chapters of this building’s story- its design (in England), construction, history and, of course, its restoration – provide useful start points from which to consider the broader historical, cultural and architectural context. For instance the lecture looks into Bombay’s economic boom of the 1860s. This coincided with the high point of the Gothic Revival: Nowhere else in the world can claim to have as magnificent an assemblage of Gothic Revival buildings. Whilst examining the city’s colonial architecture study is made of the carvings of Bombay’s Jeejeebhoy School of Art  whose Architectural Sculpture Department (during this mid-Victorian heyday) was headed up by John Lockwood Kipling, father of Rudyard Kipling. The story of the award winning project to restore the University of Mumbai’s Gothic Revival buildings provides an opportunity to touch upon philosophical approaches to conservation as well as traditional repair techniques. Account is also given of the work undertaken by those who took time away from their respective Cathedral workshops in the UK to transfer knowledge and skills to their Indian counterparts. Venturing beyond Mumbai to consider key colonial buildings in Delhi, Kolkata (Calcutta) and Yangon (Rangoon), the scope of the lecture broadens to examine evolving attitudes in India and beyond (as well as in the UK) towards the British empire and also towards the buildings which survive as testament to its achievements. Bombay University Garden, circa 1890
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training