Lectures 2017/2018 Membership Year 10 May  Susan Owens Ghosts We all know what we mean by ghosts. But what exactly do they look like? You might think that they haven’t changed much over time. But they have – and we know this because for centuries artists have been depicting them. Medieval wall-paintings represent ghosts not as insubstantial spirits, but as walking corpses that say: ‘what we are now, you will become – so mend your ways’. In illustrations to popular ballads of the 17th century, ghosts wore the shrouds they were buried in – it was much later that they began to wear voluminous white sheets. In the Victorian era, see-through ghosts were caught on camera. Some ghosts wear period costume, a signal that they are visitors from the past. Many are headless – even, curiously, when they were not decapitated. Telling the fascinating story of ghosts in English culture, this lecture draws on diverse and intriguing visual sources – medieval manuscripts and church-wall paintings, political caricatures, photography, paintings, book illustrations, magic lantern slides, optical illusions, children’s toys, films, folk art and video projections. It looks at what ghosts’ changing appearance, as depicted in the visual arts, reveals about them – and us. Background to the history of Ghosts 14 June    Simon Inglis       AGM  A Healthy Body in a Healthy Mind - sporting spectacles of Victorian Britain. This lecture argues that the modern Olympics owe more to Victorian Britain than to classical Greece. With their love of rules and regulations, often allied to their passion for gambling, British pioneers of the 19th century revolutionised the way ordinary people ‘played the game’. WG Grace made cricket a national obsession. The Scots refashioned ancient games such as goff, foot-ball and bowlis. The invention of the lawnmower and of vulcanised rubber heralded the invention of lawn tennis. Artificial ice rinks, shale running tracks, indoor swimming pools and landscaped golf courses – all were made possible by Victorian innovators. Thereafter, British manufacturers packaged and marketed these new recreational pastimes and sold them to eager audiences overseas. A century that began with bull-baiting and cock-fighting ended in ‘rational recreation’ and mass- spectator professional sport. Albion, not Olympia, provided the real model for what was to follow. Click here for more information on Victorian sporting events BBC site on Victorian sports
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
         Lectures 2017/2018 Membership Year 10 May  Susan Owens Ghosts We all know what we mean by ghosts. But what exactly do they look like? You might think that they haven’t changed much over time. But they have – and we know this because for centuries artists have been depicting them. Medieval wall-paintings represent ghosts not as insubstantial spirits, but as walking corpses that say: ‘what we are now, you will become – so mend your ways’. In illustrations to popular ballads of the 17th century, ghosts wore the shrouds they were buried in – it was much later that they began to wear voluminous white sheets. In the Victorian era, see- through ghosts were caught on camera. Some ghosts wear period costume, a signal that they are visitors from the past. Many are headless – even, curiously, when they were not decapitated. Telling the fascinating story of ghosts in English culture, this lecture draws on diverse and intriguing visual sources – medieval manuscripts and church-wall paintings, political caricatures, photography, paintings, book illustrations, magic lantern slides, optical illusions, children’s toys, films, folk art and video projections. It looks at what ghosts’ changing appearance, as depicted in the visual arts, reveals about them – and us. Background to the history of Ghosts 14 June    Simon Inglis       AGM A Healthy Body in a Healthy Mind - sporting  spectacles of Victorian Britain. This lecture argues that the modern Olympics owe more to Victorian Britain than to classical Greece. With their love of rules and regulations, often allied to their passion for gambling, British pioneers of the 19th century revolutionised the way ordinary people ‘played the game’. WG Grace made cricket a national obsession. The Scots refashioned ancient games such as goff, foot-ball and bowlis. The invention of the lawnmower and of vulcanised rubber heralded the invention of lawn tennis. Artificial ice rinks, shale running tracks, indoor swimming pools and landscaped golf courses – all were made possible by Victorian innovators. Thereafter, British manufacturers packaged and marketed these new recreational pastimes and sold them to eager audiences overseas. A century that began with bull-baiting and cock-fighting ended in ‘rational recreation’ and mass-spectator professional sport. Albion, not Olympia, provided the real model for what was to follow. Click here for more information on Victorian sporting events BBC site on Victorian sports
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training