Lectures 2017/2018 Membership Year 2017 14 December  Sarah Lenton Christmas at Covent Garden The London Christmas season was invented at Covent Garden. The first theatre on the site was the home of Harlequin and Columbine and 300 years on Harlequin and Columbine are still dancing in ‘The Nutcracker’.  Most of what we now consider to be quintessential Pantomime – principal boy, fairy tales, transformation scenes and the dame, can be traced  back to the operas and ballets put on at Covent Garden during its first 200 years.   Royal Opera House burning 1856 Panto has moved on to the Palladium, but you can still see its basic components in the seasonal operas and ballets the Royal Opera House puts on every year: Rossini’s ‘Cenerentola’ (Cinderella) for  example or Humperdinck’s ‘Hansel and Gretel’, Tchaikovsky’s ‘Sleeping Beauty’ or  Ashton’s ‘Cinderella’. The repertoire changes every year and this lecture is up­dated to include current ROH Christmas offerings. Royal Opera House 1861 Royal Opera House Covent Garden web site 2018  there is no lecture in January 8 February  Jacqui Hyman What Did the Egyptians Ever do for Bolton? Bolton’s connection to Egypt dates back to the 1860s when local cotton manufacturers began trading with cotton merchants in Alexandria. Annie Barlow, a mill owner’s daughter, had a chance meeting with Flinders Petrie whilst he was excavating in the Nile Delta, resulting in her becoming the Honorary Secretary of the Egypt Exploration Fund/Society in the North West. She collected local subscriptions for the benefit of Bolton Museum which today houses the most important and unique collection of Egyptian textile artefacts in the UK. These Egyptian textiles I have personally documented and conserved which has enabled this lecture to provide a detailed insight into the skill of the Egyptian textile weavers and embroiderers from the Pharaonic periods through to the 10th century AD. The lecture has detailed colourful images of clothing, furnishing fabrics through to mummified animals, all with a story to tell. 4th century Egyptian printed cloth. Bolton Museum Egyptian Collection Museum plans for gallery 8 March  Martin Lloyd Fuego, Humo y Hierro – how Spanish artists portrayed the iron and steel industry in Bilbao Bilbao in Spain had been producing iron for centuries, drawing in workers from all over the country. Its rapid industrialisation in the nineteenth century was helped in no little measure by British capital and entrepreneurship. By 1985, it was all over. But the rise, heyday and fall of the Bilbaoan iron industry has been fixed forever in oils, water colours and bronze. In this lecture, he first shows how iron is turned into steel, illustrating the equipment used and explaining the processes involved. He then introduces the artistic works which have recorded the iron and steel industry of Bilbao over the last 150 years and the viewer is thus equipped to identify and understand the activities represented.  Blast Furnaces in Bilbao, 1908 - Darío de Regoyos y Valdés 12 April   Dan Evans Michelangelo: Paper, Stone & Flesh Michelangelo was grumpy, dirty, ugly and tight-fisted but produced sculpture, painting and architecture of such startling beauty and originality that two biographies were written in his lifetime, we know exactly what he looked like in life and at his death and today we have over 1400 surviving letters by his own hand. Over 450 years have passed since the death of this talented yet tempestuous superstar, this lecture sets out to examine several of his drawings, a little of his poetry and a number of his finished and unfinished works with the aim of all but summoning the great man to the room. Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra Background to Michelangelo’s life 10 May  Susan Owens Ghosts We all know what we mean by ghosts. But what exactly do they look like? You might think that they haven’t changed much over time. But they have – and we know this because for centuries artists have been depicting them. Medieval wall-paintings represent ghosts not as insubstantial spirits, but as walking corpses that say: ‘what we are now, you will become – so mend your ways’. In illustrations to popular ballads of the 17th century, ghosts wore the shrouds they were buried in – it was much later that they began to wear voluminous white sheets. In the Victorian era, see-through ghosts were caught on camera. Some ghosts wear period costume, a signal that they are visitors from the past. Many are headless – even, curiously, when they were not decapitated. Telling the fascinating story of ghosts in English culture, this lecture draws on diverse and intriguing visual sources – medieval manuscripts and church-wall paintings, political caricatures, photography, paintings, book illustrations, magic lantern slides, optical illusions, children’s toys, films, folk art and video projections. It looks at what ghosts’ changing appearance, as depicted in the visual arts, reveals about them – and us. Background to the history of Ghosts 14 June    Simon Inglis       AGM  A Healthy Body in a Healthy Mind - sporting spectacles of Victorian Britain. This lecture argues that the modern Olympics owe more to Victorian Britain than to classical Greece. With their love of rules and regulations, often allied to their passion for gambling, British pioneers of the 19th century revolutionised the way ordinary people ‘played the game’. WG Grace made cricket a national obsession. The Scots refashioned ancient games such as goff, foot-ball and bowlis. The invention of the lawnmower and of vulcanised rubber heralded the invention of lawn tennis. Artificial ice rinks, shale running tracks, indoor swimming pools and landscaped golf courses – all were made possible by Victorian innovators. Thereafter, British manufacturers packaged and marketed these new recreational pastimes and sold them to eager audiences overseas. A century that began with bull-baiting and cock-fighting ended in ‘rational recreation’ and mass- spectator professional sport. Albion, not Olympia, provided the real model for what was to follow. Click here for more information on Victorian sporting events BBC site on Victorian sports
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
         Lectures 2017/2018 Membership Year 2017 14 December  Sarah Lenton Christmas at Covent Garden The London Christmas season was invented at Covent Garden. The first theatre on the site was the home of Harlequin and Columbine and 300 years on Harlequin and Columbine are still dancing in ‘The Nutcracker’.  Most of what we now consider to be quintessential Pantomime – principal boy, fairy tales, transformation scenes and the dame, can be traced  back to the operas and ballets put on at Covent Garden during its first 200 years.   Royal Opera House burning 1856 Panto has moved on to the Palladium, but you can still see its basic components in the seasonal operas and ballets the Royal Opera House puts on every year: Rossini’s ‘Cenerentola’ (Cinderella) for  example or Humperdinck’s ‘Hansel and Gretel’, Tchaikovsky’s ‘Sleeping Beauty’ or  Ashton’s ‘Cinderella’. The repertoire changes every year and this lecture is up­dated to include current ROH Christmas offerings. Royal Opera House 1861 Royal Opera House Covent Garden web site 2018  there is no lecture in January 8 February  Jacqui Hyman What Did the Egyptians Ever do for Bolton? Bolton’s connection to Egypt dates back to the 1860s when local cotton manufacturers began trading with cotton merchants in Alexandria. Annie Barlow, a mill owner’s daughter, had a chance meeting with Flinders Petrie whilst he was excavating in the Nile Delta, resulting in her becoming the Honorary Secretary of the Egypt Exploration Fund/Society in the North West. She collected local subscriptions for the benefit of Bolton Museum which today houses the most important and unique collection of Egyptian textile artefacts in the UK. These Egyptian textiles I have personally documented and conserved which has enabled this lecture to provide a detailed insight into the skill of the Egyptian textile weavers and embroiderers from the Pharaonic periods through to the 10th century AD. The lecture has detailed colourful images of clothing, furnishing fabrics through to mummified animals, all with a story to tell. 4th century Egyptian printed cloth. Bolton Museum Egyptian Collection Museum plans for gallery 8 March  Martin Lloyd Fuego, Humo y Hierro – how Spanish artists portrayed the iron and steel industry in Bilbao Bilbao in Spain had been producing iron for centuries, drawing in workers from all over the country. Its rapid industrialisation in the nineteenth century was helped in no little measure by British capital and entrepreneurship. By 1985, it was all over. But the rise, heyday and fall of the Bilbaoan iron industry has been fixed forever in oils, water colours and bronze. In this lecture, he first shows how iron is turned into steel, illustrating the equipment used and explaining the processes involved. He then introduces the artistic works which have recorded the iron and steel industry of Bilbao over the last 150 years and the viewer is thus equipped to identify and understand the activities represented.  Blast Furnaces in Bilbao, 1908 - Darío de Regoyos y Valdés 12 April   Dan Evans Michelangelo: Paper, Stone & Flesh Michelangelo was grumpy, dirty, ugly and tight-fisted but produced sculpture, painting and architecture of such startling beauty and originality that two biographies were written in his lifetime, we know exactly what he looked like in life and at his death and today we have over 1400 surviving letters by his own hand. Over 450 years have passed since the death of this talented yet tempestuous superstar, this lecture sets out to examine several of his drawings, a little of his poetry and a number of his finished and unfinished works with the aim of all but summoning the great man to the room. Portrait of Michelangelo by Daniele da Volterra Background to Michelangelo’s life 10 May  Susan Owens Ghosts We all know what we mean by ghosts. But what exactly do they look like? You might think that they haven’t changed much over time. But they have – and we know this because for centuries artists have been depicting them. Medieval wall-paintings represent ghosts not as insubstantial spirits, but as walking corpses that say: ‘what we are now, you will become – so mend your ways’. In illustrations to popular ballads of the 17th century, ghosts wore the shrouds they were buried in – it was much later that they began to wear voluminous white sheets. In the Victorian era, see- through ghosts were caught on camera. Some ghosts wear period costume, a signal that they are visitors from the past. Many are headless – even, curiously, when they were not decapitated. Telling the fascinating story of ghosts in English culture, this lecture draws on diverse and intriguing visual sources – medieval manuscripts and church-wall paintings, political caricatures, photography, paintings, book illustrations, magic lantern slides, optical illusions, children’s toys, films, folk art and video projections. It looks at what ghosts’ changing appearance, as depicted in the visual arts, reveals about them – and us. Background to the history of Ghosts 14 June    Simon Inglis       AGM A Healthy Body in a Healthy Mind - sporting  spectacles of Victorian Britain. This lecture argues that the modern Olympics owe more to Victorian Britain than to classical Greece. With their love of rules and regulations, often allied to their passion for gambling, British pioneers of the 19th century revolutionised the way ordinary people ‘played the game’. WG Grace made cricket a national obsession. The Scots refashioned ancient games such as goff, foot-ball and bowlis. The invention of the lawnmower and of vulcanised rubber heralded the invention of lawn tennis. Artificial ice rinks, shale running tracks, indoor swimming pools and landscaped golf courses – all were made possible by Victorian innovators. Thereafter, British manufacturers packaged and marketed these new recreational pastimes and sold them to eager audiences overseas. A century that began with bull-baiting and cock-fighting ended in ‘rational recreation’ and mass-spectator professional sport. Albion, not Olympia, provided the real model for what was to follow. Click here for more information on Victorian sporting events BBC site on Victorian sports
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training