Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year September 13th 2018 SECRETS OF THE ROYAL PAVILION: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF GEORGE IV’S REGENCY PALACE JACKIE MARSH-HOBBS Brighton’s Royal Pavilion is one of the most famous  and exotic buildings in Britain, attracting over 300,000 visitors per year from all over the world. Built for King George IV as his retreat from the formality of his duties as Prince Regent, its majestic Indian architecture is beautifully complemented by the chinoiserie interior. It took John Nash eight years to transform Henry Holland’s neo-classical Marine Pavilion into a spectacular palace, started for the Prince Regent and finished for him when he was the King in 1823. The extravagant lavish interior was completed by an army of craftsman, producing a staggering about of rich decorative detail, clever effects and gilding. Furniture was designed and made to be part of the decorative schemes throughout the palace, records show how various firms worked together on individual pieces. In 1850 Queen Victoria sold the Royal Pavilion to the Town Commissioners after the building had been stripped of its contents, consequently changing the palace from royal residence to civic building. Today the Royal Pavilion has been returned to its original splendour, beautifully restored and furnished, including many original artefacts on permanent loan from the royal collection. My lecture looks at the amazing history of the Royal Pavilion its secrets, struggles and magnificent interior decoration, whilst looking behind closed doors. Click here for The Royal Pavilion web site October 11th ART BEHIND BARS: THE ROLE OF THE ARTS IN THE CYCLE OF CRIME, PRISON AND RE-OFFENDING ANGELA FINDLAY Bring & Buy for C.R. Funds Years of working as an artist within the Criminal Justice System in England and Germany have given Angela unique insights into the destructive and costly cycle of crime, prisons and re- offending. In this thought- provoking talk she offers a deeper understanding of the minds, lives and challenges of offenders. And, with extraordinary slides of art projects and prisoner’s art, she demonstrates how within the process of creating art of any discipline, there are vital opportunities for offenders to confront their crimes and develop the key life skills so essential in leading a positive and productive life. A frequent response to this talk has been “I had no idea!” and indeed it casts light onto areas of our society where the Arts are not only visual, decorative, or commercial, but absolutely vital, hugely relevant and potentially life-changing. This talk is moving, informative and very original. Interspersed with personal accounts of humorous or slightly horrifying situations, Angela talks have kept audiences across the country engrossed. Click here for Angela’s web site November 8th DAZZLING DUFY: RAOUL DUFY - A LUMINOUS FEAST MARY ALEXANDER Raoul Dufy (1877-1953) was a key player in early twentieth century avant garde art, design and literary/theatrical circles in Paris. As a widely travelled polymath, Dufy's charismatic personality, wit and curiosity about the world was infectious. His imagination and  technical virtuosity - across a range of media including painting and lithography, posters, book illustration, theatrical set design, textiles and fashion, ceramics and large murals - cut across all conventional boundaries. Whether a small intricate woodcut illustrating a love poem, or the truly gigantic 1937 world fair murals depicting the role of electricity in the modern age, the effect is mesmerising. Dufy defies categorisation, constantly innovating and experimenting with new materials and effects. His analysis of the visual world is sophisticated and joyous in equal measure. Perhaps this goes some way to explain why some later critics fail to grasp its complexity and pigeonhole him a 'decorative artist', or misunderstand the irony in his witty yet gentle caricatures of elegant social life. Above Deauville, Drying the Sails (1933) Raoul Dufy at the Tate December 13th THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS RE-VISITED THROUGH ITS ILLUSTRATORS JOHN ERICSON Raffle for C.R. Funds The beauty of Kenneth Grahame’s prose is widely acknowledged but the story is so full of wonderful imagery that it almost demands to be illustrated. First published in 1908 without illustration, the classic tale of Ratty, Mole, and the incorrigible Mr Toad has been in print ever since. What is less well known is that it has been illustrated by more than ninety artists – making it the most widely illustrated book in the English language. However, ‘Willows’ is a far more interesting book than its popular and often young audience might appreciate. It deserves recognition as a novel in which adult readers will find not just humour and entertainment but wisdom and meaning. In this engaging presentation we will revisit the story as depicted by numerous well known illustrators such as E H Shepard, Arthur Rackham, Robert Ingpen, Val Biro and Inga Moore. Where appropriate we will compare and contrast the same scene in the book through the eyes of different artists, a study known as ‘comparative illustration'. We will also explore how the story came to be written for Grahame’s son Alastair and the interesting but ultimately tragic life of Kenneth Grahame. More about the book and its illustrators. 2019 There is no lecture in January February 14th BREAD & CIRCUSES: FUN, FROLIC AND FREAK SHOWS IN A MULTI-MEDIA FORMAT LIBBY HORNER It’s all Juvenal’s fault. A political strategy for keeping the masses happy – give them food and entertainment. So they had gladiators and exotic animals and chariot races – mostly pretty cruel and violent – but they also had plays and pantomimes and public baths. The Circus Maximus was huge, seating 350,000 people and one could exit via the gift shop. In 1768 the circus was reinvented in Britain by Philip Astley and celebrates its 250 th anniversary in 2018 – think of those legendary names Bertram Mills, Chipperfields and Billy Smart. Find fun, frolic and freak shows in my inimitable innovative multi-media format lecture, combining art (Laura Knight, Georges Roualt etc), photographs, archival film, songs, music and quotations from writers and poets. There might even be some bread. Click here for the history of the Circus March 14th THE WALLACE & FRICK COLLECTIONS AND THEIR CONNECTION WITH KNOLE HILARY WILLIAMS Raffle for Heritage Volunteers Amazingly the connoisseurship which led to the sumptuous collections at the Wallace Collection in London and the Frick in New York, is linked by a circle of patrons, dealers and taste.  Apart from Sir Richard and Lady Wallace and the American industrialist Henry Clay Frick, there was someone who worked for them all, who then left a related fortune to the mother of Vita Sackville-West.  Therein lies a great story. Click here to read about the Wallace collection scandal. April 11th THE MIS-SHAPEN PEARL: AN OVERVIEW OF THE MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE PERIOD SANDY BURNETT Starting in 1607 with Monteverdi’s astonishing opera Orfeo, and ending in 1759 with the death of that great “English” composer George Frideric Handel, the Baroque era produced music of great brilliance and emotional depth. In helping to navigate us through its choppy waters, Sandy draws on his experience as broadcaster, conductor and hands-on practical musician. His in-depth exploration of this fascinating period of Classical music draws on hand-picked images, autograph scores and recorded musical illustrations, with a special focus on the work of Johann Sebastian Bach. Click here for background on the baroque period music. May 9th THE RICHEST OF LEGACIES: THE BRITISH COLONIAL BUILDINGS OF INDIA ANTHONY PEERS This lecture’s narrative revolves around my experience of having masterminded a British Government backed project to restore the magnificent George Gilbert Scott designed university buildings in Mumbai (Bombay), India. The chapters of this building’s story- its design (in England), construction, history and, of course, its restoration – provide useful startpoints from which to consider the broader historical, cultural and architectural context. For instance the lecture looks into Bombay’s economic boom of the 1860s. This coincided with the high point of the Gothic Revival: Nowhere else in the world can claim to have as magnificent an assemblage of Gothic Revival buildings. Whilst examining the city’s colonial architecture study is made of the carvings of Bombay’s Jeejeebhoy School of Art (see above), whose Architectural Sculpture Department (during this mid-Victorian heyday) was headed up by John Lockwood Kipling, father of Rudyard Kipling. The story of the award winning project to restore the University of Mumbai’s Gothic Revival buildings provides an opportunity to touch upon philosophical approaches to conservation as well as traditional repair techniques. Account is also given of the work undertaken by those who took time away from their respective Cathedral workshops in the UK to transfer knowledge and skills to their Indian counterparts. Venturing beyond Mumbai to consider key colonial buildings in Delhi, Kolkata (Calcutta) and Yangon (Rangoon), the scope of the lecture broadens to examine evolving attitudes in India and beyond (as well as in the UK) towards the British empire and also towards the buildings which survive as testament to its achievements. Bombay University Garden, circa 1890
Web site designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome, Handshake Computer Training.
         Lectures 2018/19 Membership Year Lectures 2018/2019 Membership Year September 13th 2018 SECRETS OF THE ROYAL PAVILION: THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF GEORGE IV’S REGENCY PALACE JACKIE MARSH-HOBBS Brighton’s Royal Pavilion is one of the most famous and exotic buildings in Britain, attracting over 300,000 visitors per year from all over the world. Built for King George IV as his retreat from the formality of his duties as Prince Regent, its majestic Indian architecture is beautifully complemented by the chinoiserie interior. It took John Nash eight years to transform Henry Holland’s neo-classical Marine Pavilion into a spectacular palace, started for the Prince Regent and finished for him when he was the King in 1823. The extravagant lavish interior was completed by an army of craftsman, producing a staggering about of rich decorative detail, clever effects and gilding. Furniture was designed and made to be part of the decorative schemes throughout the palace, records show how various firms worked together on individual pieces. In 1850 Queen Victoria sold the Royal Pavilion to the Town Commissioners after the building had been stripped of its contents, consequently changing the palace from royal residence to civic building. Today the Royal Pavilion has been returned to its original splendour, beautifully restored and furnished, including many original artefacts on permanent loan from the royal collection. My lecture looks at the amazing history of the Royal Pavilion its secrets, struggles and magnificent interior decoration, whilst looking behind closed doors. Click here for The Royal Pavilion web site October 11th ART BEHIND BARS: THE ROLE OF THE ARTS IN THE CYCLE OF CRIME, PRISON AND RE-OFFENDING ANGELA FINDLAY Bring & Buy for C.R. Funds Years of working as an artist within the Criminal Justice System in England and Germany have given Angela unique insights into the destructive and costly cycle of crime, prisons and re-offending. In this thought-provoking talk she offers a deeper understanding of the minds, lives and challenges of offenders. And, with extraordinary slides of art projects and prisoner’s art, she demonstrates how within the process of creating art of any discipline, there are vital opportunities for offenders to confront their crimes and develop the key life skills so essential in leading a positive and productive life. A frequent response to this talk has been “I had no idea!” and indeed it casts light onto areas of our society where the Arts are not only visual, decorative, or commercial, but absolutely vital, hugely relevant and potentially life- changing. This talk is moving, informative and very original. Interspersed with personal accounts of humorous or slightly horrifying situations, Angela talks have kept audiences across the country engrossed. Click here for Angela’s web site November 8th DAZZLING DUFY: RAOUL DUFY - A LUMINOUS FEAST MARY ALEXANDER Raoul Dufy (1877-1953) was a key player in early twentieth century avant garde art, design and literary/theatrical circles in Paris. As a widely travelled polymath, Dufy's charismatic personality, wit and curiosity about the world was infectious. His imagination and technical virtuosity - across a range of media including painting and lithography, posters, book illustration, theatrical set design, textiles and fashion, ceramics and large murals - cut across all conventional boundaries. Whether a small intricate woodcut illustrating a love poem, or the truly gigantic 1937 world fair murals depicting the role of electricity in the modern age, the effect is mesmerising. Dufy defies categorisation, constantly innovating and experimenting with new materials and effects. His analysis of the visual world is sophisticated and joyous in equal measure. Perhaps this goes some way to explain why some later critics fail to grasp its complexity and pigeon hole him a 'decorative artist', or misunderstand the irony in his witty yet gentle caricatures of elegant social life. Above Deauville, Drying the Sails (1933) Raoul Dufy at the Tate December 13th THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS RE-VISITED THROUGH ITS ILLUSTRATORS JOHN ERICSON Raffle for C.R. Funds The beauty of Kenneth Grahame’s prose is widely acknowledged but the story is so full of wonderful imagery that it almost demands to be illustrated. First published in 1908 without illustration, the classic tale of Ratty, Mole, and the incorrigible Mr Toad has been in print ever since. What is less well known is that it has been illustrated by more than ninety artists – making it the most widely illustrated book in the English language. However, ‘Willows’ is a far more interesting book than its popular and often young audience might appreciate. It deserves recognition as a novel in which adult readers will find not just humour and entertainment but wisdom and meaning. In this engaging presentation we will revisit the story as depicted by numerous well known illustrators such as E H Shepard, Arthur Rackham, Robert Ingpen, Val Biro and Inga Moore. Where appropriate we will compare and contrast the same scene in the book through the eyes of different artists, a study known as ‘comparative illustration'. We will also explore how the story came to be written for Grahame’s son Alastair and the interesting but ultimately tragic life of Kenneth Grahame. More about the book and its illustrators. 2019 There is no lecture in January February 14th BREAD & CIRCUSES: FUN, FROLIC AND FREAK SHOWS IN A MULTI-MEDIA FORMAT LIBBY HORNER It’s all Juvenal’s fault. A political strategy for keeping the masses happy – give them food and entertainment. So they had gladiators and exotic animals and chariot races – mostly pretty cruel and violent – but they also had plays and pantomimes and public baths. The Circus Maximus was huge, seating 350,000 people and one could exit via the gift shop. In 1768 the circus was reinvented in Britain by Philip Astley and celebrates its 250 th anniversary in 2018 – think of those legendary names Bertram Mills, Chipperfields and Billy Smart. Find fun, frolic and freak shows in my inimitable innovative multi- media format lecture, combining art (Laura Knight, Georges Roualt etc), photographs, archival film, songs, music and quotations from writers and poets. There might even be some bread. Click here for the history of the Circus March 14th THE WALLACE & FRICK COLLECTIONS AND THEIR CONNECTION WITH KNOLE HILARY WILLIAMS Raffle for Heritage Volunteers Amazingly the connoisseurship which led to the sumptuous collections at the Wallace Collection in London and the Frick in New York, is linked by a circle of patrons, dealers and taste.  Apart from Sir Richard and Lady Wallace and the American industrialist Henry Clay Frick, there was someone who worked for them all, who then left a related fortune to the mother of Vita Sackville-West.  Therein lies a great story. Click here to read about the Wallace collection scandal. April 11th THE MIS-SHAPEN PEARL: AN OVERVIEW OF THE MUSIC OF THE BAROQUE PERIOD SANDY BURNETT Starting in 1607 with Monteverdi’s astonishing opera Orfeo, and ending in 1759 with the death of that great “English” composer George Frideric Handel, the Baroque era produced music of great brilliance and emotional depth. In helping to navigate us through its choppy waters, Sandy draws on his experience as broadcaster, conductor and hands-on practical musician. His in-depth exploration of this fascinating period of Classical music draws on hand- picked images, autograph scores and recorded musical illustrations, with a special focus on the work of Johann Sebastian Bach. Click here for background on the baroque period music. May 9th THE RICHEST OF LEGACIES: THE BRITISH COLONIAL BUILDINGS OF INDIA ANTHONY PEERS This lecture’s narrative revolves around my experience of having masterminded a British Government backed project to restore the magnificent George Gilbert Scott designed university buildings in Mumbai (Bombay), India. The chapters of this building’s story- its design (in England), construction, history and, of course, its restoration – provide useful start points from which to consider the broader historical, cultural and architectural context. For instance the lecture looks into Bombay’s economic boom of the 1860s. This coincided with the high point of the Gothic Revival: Nowhere else in the world can claim to have as magnificent an assemblage of Gothic Revival buildings. Whilst examining the city’s colonial architecture study is made of the carvings of Bombay’s Jeejeebhoy School of Art  whose Architectural Sculpture Department (during this mid-Victorian heyday) was headed up by John Lockwood Kipling, father of Rudyard Kipling. The story of the award winning project to restore the University of Mumbai’s Gothic Revival buildings provides an opportunity to touch upon philosophical approaches to conservation as well as traditional repair techniques. Account is also given of the work undertaken by those who took time away from their respective Cathedral workshops in the UK to transfer knowledge and skills to their Indian counterparts. Venturing beyond Mumbai to consider key colonial buildings in Delhi, Kolkata (Calcutta) and Yangon (Rangoon), the scope of the lecture broadens to examine evolving attitudes in India and beyond (as well as in the UK) towards the British empire and also towards the buildings which survive as testament to its achievements. Bombay University Garden, circa 1890
Web site and mobile pages designed, created and maintained by Janet Groome Handshake Computer Training